Explore the historic Tyne Valley scenic rail line in Britain
Explore the historic Tyne Valley
Tyne Valley Line
Newcastle - Carlisle
3:00
Hours from
LONDON
2:30
Hours from
Manchester

Plan your trip

Take the train from Manchester Victoria to Newcastle Central Station. Trains are frequent (look up times) and take approximately 2 hours 27 minutes.

Places to explore along the Tyne Valley Line include:

From leaving Newcastle, this is a stunning line. Crossing the Tyne at Newcastle (with multiple bridges and world famous Tyne bridge) is impressive. Whilst you’re in the city why not explore the MetroCentre – the largest shopping centre in Europe when it first opened and take a walk around the bustling shops. Stop for a bite to eat with plenty of places to eat and drink you’ll be spoilt for choice.

Wylam -  the birthplace of railways. Stephenson’s Birthplace (owned by the National Trust) is a mile from the station, Hackworth lived here (who was involved in building the Puffing Billy) and Charles Parsons (who invented the steam turbine) also lived here. There is also a smaller version of the Tyne Bridge. Wylam welcomes visitors with walks and tea rooms.

The railway line enters Prudhoe beside a paper factory, but look up and there is an impressive castle (English Heritage).

At Stocksfield and Riding Mill the architecture of the Newcastle and Carlisle Railway becomes clear, and the railway line follows the river Tyne.

Corbridge is home to a Roman Fort (about 1.5 miles from the station) (English Heritage) and on the platform in an original station building in the Valley Restaurant. Corbridge is a vibrant town with coffee and gift shops.

Hexham – big tourist town, with medieval gaol,  abbey river bank walks, good shopping.

Haydon Bridge This is an alighting point for Northumberland National Park and the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The painter John Martin came from here (and Philip Larkin came for his weekend escapes).

Bardon Mill – good walks and refreshments in a small café or the pub. The village is also home to Errington Reay pottery. 

Haltwhistle – need to link in to the AD122 bus service which runs from Hexham and Haltwhistle stations to the Roman Wall. The brand new (opening 2017) landscape discovery centre The Sill is not far away. Haltwhistle has the most number of Bastles (fortified houses) due to its location in the Border wars.

Brampton – This is where Thomas Edmondson first invited the card ticket. Again, a lot to explore from Brampton, Talkin Tarn (a Cumbrian lake) can be walked to from the station.

Wetheral – the station sits at one end the rail viaduct which is high above the river Eden. There is a public footpath across the viaduct and a walk across is thoroughly recommended.

More lines to explore nearby



Nearby heritage railways

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